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All Flash Arrays and latency

TheRegister - 21 hours 7 min ago
Navigating the hype

Sponsored There is no doubt it can be difficult to navigate the various claims made by storage vendors when it comes to performance of their products.…

ExLight Linux Distro Now Based on Ubuntu 17.10, Features Enlightenment Desktop

LXer - 21 hours 15 min ago
A new version of the ExLight GNU/Linux distribution hit the streets this week bringing users an Ubuntu 17.10-based desktop experience featuring the lightweight Enlightenment desktop environment.

Microsoft can't give away beta cert exams, so starts charging

TheRegister - 21 hours 24 min ago
Naughty you: 'No show rate is at historic highs' for tests and that pollutes Redmond's data

Microsoft can't give away enough of its beta exams, so it will start charging for them.…

Azure turns on reserved cloudy VMs, without Hotel California clause

TheRegister - Thu, 11/16/2017 - 21:56
Back to capex spending, but refunds offered to those who bail on multi-year commitments

Microsoft's added reserved instances to Azure, with an out-clause for cloudy quitters.…

Record and Share Terminal Session with Showterm

LXer - Thu, 11/16/2017 - 21:39
You can record a terminal session with any screen recording program, but Showterm for Linux makes it very easy to record and embed on a site. Here’s how it works.

Detroit's Marginalized Communities Are Building Their Own Internet

Slashdot - Thu, 11/16/2017 - 21:30
An anonymous reader writes: Motherboard has a report that discusses how some of Detroit's communities are building their own internet to help close the gap between the roughly 60 percent of Detroiters who have internet and 40 percent who don't. From the report: "[Diana Nucera, director of the Detroit Community Technology Project] is part of a growing cohort of Detroiters who have started a grassroots movement to close that gap, by building the internet themselves. It's a coalition of community members and multiple Detroit nonprofits. They're starting with three underserved neighborhoods, installing high speed internet that beams shared gigabit connections from an antenna on top of the tallest building on the street, and into the homes of people who have long gone without. They call it the Equitable Internet Initiative. The issue isn't only cost, though it is prohibitive for many Detroiters, but also infrastructure. Because of Detroit's economic woes, many Big Telecom companies haven't thought it worthwhile to invest in expanding their network to these communities. The city is filled with dark fiber optic cable that's not connected to any homes or businesses -- relics from more optimistic days. Residents who can't afford internet, are on some kind of federal or city subsidy like food stamps, and students are prioritized for the Initiative, Nucera told me. The whole effort started last summer with enlisting digital stewards, locals from each neighborhood who were interested in working for the nonprofit coalition, doing everything from spreading the word, to teaching digital literacy, to installing routers and pulling fiber. Many of these stewards started out with little or no tech expertise, but after a 20-week-long training period, they've become experts able to install, troubleshoot, and maintain a network from end to end. They're also aiming to spread digital literacy, so people can truly own the network themselves."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

WordPress 4.9: This one's for you, developers!

TheRegister - Thu, 11/16/2017 - 20:58
'New editing experience' called Gutenberg coming too, but it might hate your plugins

WordPress 4.9 has debuted, and this time the world's most popular content management system has given developers plenty to like.…

Wandboard.org launches i.MX8M-based SBC with RPi expansion

LXer - Thu, 11/16/2017 - 20:29
Technexion’s Wandboard.org unveiled open source “Wand-Pi-8M” SBCs that run Linux on a quad-A53 i.MX8M, and offer WiFi/BT, GbE, HDMI 2.0, and a 40-pin RPi link. Technexion and its Wandboard.org community project opened pre-orders on three successors to its i.MX6 based Wandboard and almost identical Wandboard Reload SBCs that tap NXP’s long awaited, quad-core, Cortex-A53 i.MX8M SoC.

Report Claims That 18 Nation's Elections Were Impacted By Social Engineering Last Year

Slashdot - Thu, 11/16/2017 - 20:05
sqorbit writes: Independent watchdog group Freedom House released a report that claims that 18 nation's elections were "hacked." Of the 65 countries that Freedom House monitors, 30 appear to be using social media in order to affect elections by attempting to control online discussions. The report covers fake news posts, paid online opinion writers and trolling tactics. Other items in the report speak to online censorship and VPN blocking that blocks information within countries to interfere with elections. The report says net freedom could be aided by: large-scale programs that showed people how to spot fake news; putting tight controls on political adverts; and making social media giants do more to remove bots and tune algorithms to be more objective.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Hitachi Vantara plans refresh of mid-range and top-end storage in 2018

TheRegister - Thu, 11/16/2017 - 19:55
It's mostly an IoT-centric system integrator now, but may sprout new scale-out arrays

Hitachi Vantara, the mash-up of Hitachi Data Systems (HDS), Pentaho and the Lumada IoT assets from the Hitachi Insight Group, is working on new scale-out storage products to support its ambition to become a system integrator for analytical workloads and the myriad data sources that feed them.…

Bluetooth Hack Affects 20 Million Amazon Echo, Google Home Devices

Slashdot - Thu, 11/16/2017 - 19:25
In September, security researchers discovered eight vulnerabilities -- codenamed collectively as BlueBorne -- in the Bluetooth implementations used by over 5.3 billion devices. We have now learned that an estimated 20 million Amazon Echo and Google Home devices are also vulnerable to attacks leveraging the BlueBorne vulnerabilities. The Hacker News reports: Amazon Echo is affected by the following two vulnerabilities: a remote code execution vulnerability in the Linux kernel (CVE-2017-1000251); and an information disclosure flaw in the SDP server (CVE-2017-1000250). Since different Echo's variants use different operating systems, other Echo devices are affected by either the vulnerabilities found in Linux or Android. Whereas, Google Home devices are affected by one vulnerability: information disclosure vulnerability in Android's Bluetooth stack (CVE-2017-0785). This Android flaw can also be exploited to cause a denial-of-service (DoS) condition. Since Bluetooth cannot be disabled on either of the voice-activated personal assistants, attackers within the range of the affected device can easily launch an attack. The security firm [Armis, who disclosed the issue] notified both Amazon and Google about its findings, and both companies have released patches and issued automatic updates for the Amazon Echo and Google Home that fixes the BlueBorne attacks.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

After a year of intensely investigating password theft, here's what Google found

LXer - Thu, 11/16/2017 - 19:14
Hackers are constantly trying to break into Google accounts, so Google researchers spent a year tracing how hackers steal passwords and expose them on the internet's black market.

Robocall crackdown, choked Lifelines, and pole-climbing: Your new FCC rules roundup

TheRegister - Thu, 11/16/2017 - 19:03
Fresh round of overhauls, and some aren't happy about it

US broadband watchdog the FCC signed off on a pile of new rules Thursday – including laws that will dictate how telcos handle robocalls, cut access for poor Americans to subsidized phone service, add controversial changes to TV station ownership rules, and regulations for fiber cable installation.…

Virgin Hyperloop One Eyes India For Possible High-Speed Routes

Slashdot - Thu, 11/16/2017 - 18:45
India is officially being added to the list of nations that have expressed interest in near-supersonic, tube-based travel. Virgin Hyperloop One "signed agreements with the governments of Maharashtra and Karnataka to begin studying the impact of a hyperloop in the region," reports The Verge. "The feasibility studies have implications for India's giant cities like Mumbai and Bangalore, as well as fast-growing urban centers like Pune and Nagpur." From the report: The agreements are signs that despite its lack of a commercial product or human-ready testing, Virgin Hyperloop One has shown a tenacity for securing agreements with willing government partners. The company recently announced 10 winning submissions in a long-running contest to find what it believes to be the best places to build the first hyperloop routes in the world. Ten teams across five countries (Mexico, India, the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada) were picked from the original 2,600 submissions, and the routes range in size from about 200 to nearly 700 miles, depending on the location. Virgin Hyperloop One hasn't specified the length of the routes it would build in India -- to be sure, it remains possible that none of these proposed routes get built -- but it did tease some of the possibilities in terms of reduction in travel time. For example, it would take just 14 minutes to travel between Mumbai and the fast-growing city of Pune, a journey that currently takes up to three hours by car. Also, it could look at connecting Nagpur, which is in the easternmost part of Maharashtra, with Mumbai and Pune to vastly improve passenger and freight transportation.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Hey, cop! You need a warrant to stalk a phone with a Stingray – judge

TheRegister - Thu, 11/16/2017 - 18:28
Knew we shouldn't have told you about that mobe-tracking gizmo

Analysis A New York judge has this month told cops that they need to get a warrant before they can use a controversial Stingray phone-tracking gadget to hunt down suspects.…

FCC Repeals Decades-Old Rules Blocking Broadcast Media Mergers

Slashdot - Thu, 11/16/2017 - 18:03
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Washington Post (Warning: source may be paywalled; alternative source): Federal regulators rolled back decades-old rules on Thursday, making it far easier for media outlets to be bought and sold -- potentially leading to more newspapers, radio stations and television broadcasters being owned by a handful of companies. The regulations, eliminated in a 3-to-2 vote by the Federal Communications Commission, were first put in place in the 1970s to ensure that a diversity of voices and opinions could be heard on the air or in print. But now those rules represent a threat to small outlets that are struggling to survive in a vastly different media world, according to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai. One long-standing rule repealed Thursday prevented one company in a given media market from owning both a daily newspaper and a TV station. Another rule blocked TV stations in the same market from merging with each other if the combination would leave fewer than eight independently owned stations. The agency also took aim at rules restricting the number of TV and radio stations that any media company could simultaneously own in a single market. A major beneficiary of the deregulatory moves, analysts say, is Sinclair, a conservative broadcasting company that is seeking to buy up Tribune Media for $3.9 billion.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Firefox Quantum Now Rolling Out to All Ubuntu Linux Users, Update Now

LXer - Thu, 11/16/2017 - 18:00
Canonical announced today the general availability of the latest Mozilla Firefox 57.0 Quantum web browser for all of its supported Ubuntu Linux releases.

Kaspersky: Clumsy NSA leak snoop's PC was packed with malware

TheRegister - Thu, 11/16/2017 - 17:59
Lab suspects Chinese spyware was on home computer

Kaspersky Lab, the US government's least favorite computer security outfit, has published its full technical report into claims Russian intelligence used its antivirus tools to steal NSA secrets.…

US govt to use software to finger immigrants as potential crims? That's really dumb – boffins

TheRegister - Thu, 11/16/2017 - 17:29
Algorithms will label innocent people terrorists, DHS warned

A group of 54 computer scientists and academic researchers on Thursday asked the US Department of Homeland Security to rethink its plan for employing software algorithms to determine whether immigrants to the country should be admitted or deported.…

China Builds World's Fastest Hypersonic Wind Tunnel To Simulate Flight At 27,000 MPH

Slashdot - Thu, 11/16/2017 - 17:20
schwit1 quotes a report from South China Morning Post: China is building the world's fastest wind tunnel to simulate hypersonic flight at speeds of up to 12 kilometers per second (~27,000 miles per hour). Zhao Wei, a senior scientist working on the project, said researchers aimed to have the facility up and running by around 2020 to meet the pressing demand of China's hypersonic weapon development program. "It will boost the engineering application of hypersonic technology, mostly in military sectors, by duplicating the environment of extreme hypersonic flights, so problems can be discovered and solved on the ground," said Zhao. The world's most powerful wind tunnel at present is America's LENX-X facility in Buffalo, New York state, which operates at speeds of up to 10 kilometers per second -- 30 times the speed of sound. Hypersonic aircraft are defined as vehicles that travel at speeds of Mach 5, five times the speed of sound, or above. In the new tunnel there will be a test chamber with room for relatively large aircraft models with a wing span of almost three meters. To generate an airflow at extremely high speeds, the researchers will detonate several tubes containing a mixture of oxygen, hydrogen and nitrogen gases to create a series of explosions that can discharge one gigawatt of power within a split second, according to Zhao. The shock waves, channelled into the test chamber through a metallic tunnel, will envelope the prototype vehicle and increase the temperature over its body to 8,000 Kelvins, or 7,727 degrees Celsius, Zhao said. The new tunnel would also be used to test the scramjet, a new type of jet engine designed specifically for hypersonic flights. Traditional jet engines are not capable of handling air flows at such speeds.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

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