Feed aggregator

Mars is red, Earth is blue. Here's a space laser story for you

TheRegister - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 23:31
NASA to take Mars meteor from London and use it for target practise ahead of 2020 mission

NASA has decided to use fragments of Martian meteorites for target practice ahead of the Mars 2020 mission, then send one back to Mars.…

Meltdown-and-Spectre-detector comes to Windows Analytics

TheRegister - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 23:02
After flubbing its early responses, Microsoft's thrown sysadmins a bone

Microsoft's added a Meltdown-and-Spectre detector to Windows Analytics, the company's telemetry analysis tool for sysadmins.…

How to clone, modify, add, and delete files in Git

LXer - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 22:32
In the first article in this series on getting started with Git, we created a simple Git repo and added a file to it by connecting it with our computer. In this article, we will learn a handful of other things about Git, namely how to clone (download), modify, add, and delete files in a Git repo.read more

Citrix swallows Cedexis to give NetScaler more multi-cloud cred

TheRegister - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 21:58
Nobody wants slow SaaS or cross-cloud comms, but Citrix wants you to cough up to stop it

Citrix has bought traffic optimisation company Cedexis for an undisclosed sum.…

Hospitals May Turn To Algorithms To Fight Fatal Infections

Slashdot - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 21:30
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Scientific American: Clostridium difficile, a deadly bacterium spread by physical contact with objects or infected people, thrives in hospitals, causing 453,000 cases a year and 29,000 deaths in the United States, according to a 2015 study in the New England Journal of Medicine. Traditional methods such as monitoring hygiene and warning signs often fail to stop the disease. But what if it were possible to systematically target those most vulnerable to C-diff? Erica Shenoy, an infectious-disease specialist at Massachusetts General Hospital, and Jenna Wiens, a computer scientist and assistant professor of engineering at the University of Michigan, did just that when they created an algorithm to predict a patient's risk of developing a C-diff infection, or CDI. Using patients' vital signs and other health records, this method -- still in an experimental phase -- is something both researchers want to see integrated into hospital routines. The CDI algorithm -- based on a form of artificial intelligence called machine learning -- is at the leading edge of a technological wave starting to hit the U.S. health care industry. After years of experimentation, machine learning's predictive powers are well-established, and it is poised to move from labs to broad real-world applications, said Zeeshan Syed, who directs Stanford University's Clinical Inference and Algorithms Program. Shenoy and Wiens' CDI algorithm analyzed a data set from 374,000 inpatient admissions to Massachusetts General Hospital and the University of Michigan Health System, seeking connections between cases of CDI and the circumstances behind them. The records contained over 4,000 distinct variables. As it repeatedly analyzes this data, the ML process extracts warning signs of disease that doctors may miss -- constellations of symptoms, circumstances and details of medical history most likely to result in infection at any point in the hospital stay.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Install OpenStack on Ubuntu

LXer - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 21:12
Using the cloud to create your own cloud. We will be using DigitalOcean to give a peek inside OpenStack - A cloud management operating system that's setting a standard for the entire industry.

Roses are red, violets are blue, VMware's made a new vSphere for you

TheRegister - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 20:58
Version 6.7 should land in Q2, may end support for older CPUs

VMware's still trying to encourage upgrades to version 6.0 and 6.5 of its vSphere platform, but that hasn't stopped it from working on a new version too.…

New York Times CEO: Print Journalism Has Maybe Another 10 Years

Slashdot - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 20:10
New York Times CEO Mark Thompson believes that the newspaper printing presses may have another decade of life in them, but not much more. "I believe at least 10 years is what we can see in the U.S. for our print products," Thompson said on "Power Lunch." He said he'd like to have the print edition "survive and thrive as long as it can," but admitted it might face an expiration date. "We'll decide that simply on economics," he said. "There may come a point when the economics of [the print paper] no longer make sense for us. The key thing for us is that we're pivoting. Our plan is to go on serving our loyal print subscribers as long as we can. But meanwhile to build up the digital business, so that we have a successful growing company and a successful news operation long after print is gone." CNBC reports: Digital subscriptions, in fact, may be what's keeping the New York Times afloat for a new generation of readers. While Thompson said the number of print subscribers is relatively constant, "with a little bit of a decline every time," the company said last week that it added 157,000 digital subscribers in the fourth quarter of 2017. The majority were new subscribers, but that number also included cooking and crossword subscriptions. Revenue from digital subscriptions increased more than 51 percent in the quarter compared with a year earlier. Overall subscription revenue increased 19.2 percent. Meanwhile, the company's fourth-quarter earnings and revenue beat analysts expectations, "even though the print side of the business is still somewhat challenged," Thompson said. Total revenue rose 10 percent from a year earlier to $484.1 million. New York Times' shares have risen more than 20 percent this year. "Without question we make more money on a print subscriber," Thompson added. "But the point about digital is that we believe we can grow many, many more of them. We've already got more digital than print subscribers. Digital is growing very rapidly. Ultimately, there will be many times the number of digital subscribers compared to print."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Last Chance to Save $150 on ELC + OpenIoT Summit North America

LXer - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 19:52
ELC, now in its 13th year, is the top vendor-neutral technical conference for companies and developers using Linux in embedded products. Attend to collaborate with the technologists working on the latest in embedded systems, frameworks and applications.

Rogue IT admin goes off the rails, shuts down Canadian train switches

TheRegister - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 19:51
Grouchy Grupe gets a year and a day behind bars after going loco on network hardware

A former IT administrator at the Canadian Pacific Railway has been jailed for 366 days for sabotaging the organization's computer network.…

Kaspersky Says Telegram Flaw Used For Cryptocurrency Mining

Slashdot - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 19:50
According to Kaspersky Lab, hackers have been exploiting a vulnerability in Telegram's desktop client to mine cryptocurrencies such as Monero and ZCash. "Kaspersky said on its website that users were tricked into downloading malicious software onto their computers that used their processing power to mine currency, or serve as a backdoor for attackers to remotely control a machine," reports Bloomberg. From the report: While analyzing the servers of malicious actors, Kaspersky researchers also found archives containing a cache of Telegram data that had been stolen from victims. The Russian security firm said it "reported the vulnerability to Telegram and, at the time of publication, the zero-day flaw has not since been observed in messenger's products."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Seattle To Remove Controversial City Spying Network After Public Backlash

Slashdot - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 19:30
schwit1 shares a report from Activist Post: Following years of resistance from citizens, the city of Seattle has decided to completely remove controversial surveillance equipment -- at a cost of $150,000. In November 2013, Seattle residents pushed back against the installation of several mesh network nodes attached to utility poles around the downtown area. The American Civil Liberties Union of Washington and privacy advocates were immediately concerned about the ability of the nodes to gather user information via the Wi-Fi connection. The Seattle Times reports on the latest developments: "Seattle's wireless mesh network, a node of controversy about police surveillance and the role of federal funding in city policing, is coming down. Megan Erb, spokeswoman for Seattle Information Technology, said the city has budgeted $150,000 for contractor Prime Electric and city employees to remove dozens of surveillance cameras and 158 'wireless access points' -- little, off-white boxes with antennae mounted on utility poles around the city." The nodes were purchased by the Seattle Police Department via a $3.6 million grant from the Department of Homeland Security. The Seattle Police Department argued the network would be helpful for protecting the port and for first-responder communication during emergencies. As the Times notes, "the mesh network, according to the ACLU, news reports and anti-surveillance activists from Seattle Privacy Coalition, had the potential to track and log every wireless device that moved through its system: people attending protests, people getting cups of coffee, people going to a hotel in the middle of the workday." However, by November 2013, SPD spokesman Sean Whitcomb announced, "The wireless mesh network will be deactivated until city council approves a draft (privacy) policy and until there's an opportunity for vigorous public debate." The privacy policy for the network was never developed and, instead, the city has now opted to remove the devices at a cost of $150,000. The Times notes that, "crews are tearing its hardware down and repurposing the usable parts for other city agencies, including Seattle Department of Transportation traffic cameras."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Roses are red, Windows error screens are blue. It's 2018, and an email can still pwn you

TheRegister - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 19:01
Here's a bumper crop of security fixes you do not want to miss

Patch Tuesday Serious security flaws in Outlook and Edge are headlining a busy Microsoft Patch Tuesday.…

Trump Administration Wants To Fire 248 Forecasters At the National Weather Service

Slashdot - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 18:50
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Fortune: After a year that saw over $300 million in damages from hurricanes, wildfires, and other natural disasters, the Trump administration is proposing significant cuts to the National Weather Service (NWS) and hopes to eliminate the jobs of 248 weather forecasters. The idea, which is part of the 2019 fiscal budget proposal and caught the agency by surprise, is being derided by the NWS's labor union, which says the cuts will impact the reliability of future weather forecasts and warnings. All totaled, the Weather Service faces cuts of $75 million in the initial proposal. Some or all of those cuts could be jettisoned before the bill is voted upon. "We can't take any more cuts and still do the job that the American public needs us to do -- there simply will not be the staff available on duty to issue the forecasts and warnings upon which the country depends," said Dan Sobien, the president of the National Weather Service Employees Organization. Further reading: The Washington Post

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Shell Scripting and Security

LXer - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 18:32
Whether you have Linux running on your laptop or ancient PC file server or whether you're managing a data center, your system is also vulnerable to malicious users. I can't offer any sort of robust solution in this article, but let's have a look at some basic things you can do with shell scripts to keep an eye on your system.

Google Is Adding Snapchat-Style Stories To Mobile Search Results

Slashdot - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 18:10
Google is rolling out tappable, visual stories that incorporate text, images, and videos in the style made popular by Snapchat. "It started widely testing the multimedia format, called AMP stories, today (Feb. 13) in an effort to help publishers engage more with readers on mobile," reports Quartz. Google announced the feature in a developer blog post. From the report: Users can now find Google stories in search results -- in a box called "visual stories" -- when they search on mobile at g.co/ampstories for the names of publishers that have begun using the format, such as CNN, Conde Nast, Hearst, Mashable, Meredith, Mic, Vox Media, and the Washington Post brands. Google worked with those publishers to develop the format. Desktop users can also get a taste of stories through Google's Accelerate Mobile Pages site. When a user selects a story, like Cosmopolitan magazine's piece on apple cider vinegar, it displays in a full-screen, slideshow format, similar to those on Snapchat and Instagram. The multimedia format is part of Google's Accelerated Mobile Pages (AMP) project, a competitor to Facebook's Instant Articles that helps load pages faster on mobile devices. Like AMP, the AMP story format is open-sourced, so anyone can use it. However, Google is reportedly only displaying stories from a select group of publishers, including those it partnered with on the development, on its own site at the moment. The company said it plans to bring AMP stories to more Google products in the future, and expand the ways they appear in Google search.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Pressure mounts on FCC to cough up answers over fake net neutrality comments

TheRegister - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 18:01
House Dems send snotagram to watchdog boss

Analysis US lawmakers have weighed in on the FCC's controversial vote to scrap America's net neutrality rules, demanding information on the millions of fake comments submitted to the watchdog's public consultation on the decision – and asking pointed questions about how the federal regulator handled them.…

Huawei Got People To Write Fake Reviews For An Unreleased Phone

Slashdot - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 17:30
As spotted by 9to5Google, Huawei has apparently posted fake reviews on Best Buy for its new Mate 10 Pro, which is available for pre-order in the U.S. despite not having any deals with U.S. carriers. "The fake reviews, which are exclusively on the Best Buy website, are likely the result of a contest Huawei ran on Facebook," reports The Verge. From the report: On January 31st, the company posted to a Facebook group with over 60,000 members, asking for people to leave comments on the Best Buy pre-sale page in exchange for a chance to beta test a Mate 10 Pro. The original post has been deleted, but 9to5Google obtained a screenshot before it went down. "Tell us how to why (sic) you WANT to own the Mate 10 Pro in the review section of our pre-sale Best Buy retail page," the post states. On the Best Buy site, there are currently 108 reviews for the phone, 103 of which were written on or after January 31st, the day Huawei posted the contest. Many of the comments directly reference not having any actual hands-on experience with the product itself, but give the phone a five star rating. "I can't wait to get my hands on this phone and demonstrate how amazing it is to people," reads one. "This device looks exciting and beautiful and it would be amazing to have a chance to beta test it," another reads. It seems Huawei is betting that loads of high ratings early on will make people trust the product and lead to higher sales. That's all well and good except that these types of reviews are strictly against Best Buy policy, as 9to5Google points out. "Huawei's first priority is always the consumer and we encourage our customers to share their experiences with our devices in their own voice and through authentic conversation," a Huawei representative told The Verge in a statement. "While there are reviews from beta testers with extensive knowledge of the product, they were in no way given monetary benefits for providing their honest opinions of the product. However, we are working to remove posts by beta testers where it isn't disclosed they participated in the review program."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Is Open Source RISC-V Ready to Take on Intel, AMD, and ARM in the Data Center?

LXer - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 17:12
Open source startup SiFive introduces a single board computer running Linux on the open RISC-V architecture. Is the data center next?

Who wants dynamic dancing animations and code in their emails? Everyone! says Google

TheRegister - Tue, 02/13/2018 - 17:01
Y'all loved AMP for the web, now get it in your inboxes

Having last year axed its scanning of Gmail messages after years of withering privacy criticism, Google has decided to court controversy again in this area.…

Syndicate content