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Wires, chips, and LEDs: US trade bigwigs detail Chinese kit that's going to cost a lot more

TheRegister - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 17:09
'You want a war? Well done, you've got one' replies China

The Trump administration is moving forward with its plans to implement tariffs on Chinese goods coming into America. On Friday, it published a list of products totaling $34bn that will be subjected to a 25 per cent charge to importers, and another $16bn worth of goods that could be added to the list.…

BLUI: An easy way to create game UI

LXer - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 17:07
Game development engines have become increasingly accessible in the last few years. Engines like Unity, which has always been free to use, and Unreal, which recently switched from a subscription-based service to a free service, allow independent developers access to the same industry-standard tools used by AAA publishers. While neither of these engines is open source, each has enabled the growth of open source ecosystems around it.

Making Buildings, Cars and Planes From Materials Based on Plant Fibres

Slashdot - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 16:40
Materials-science researchers are finding that plant fibres can add durability and strength to substances already used in the construction of buildings and in goods that range from toys and furniture to cars and aircraft. From a report: A big bonus is that, because plants lock up carbon in their structure, using their fibres to make things should mean less carbon dioxide is emitted. The production of concrete alone represents some 5% of man-made global CO{-2} emissions, and making 1kg of plastic from oil produces 6kg of the greenhouse gas. Start with the carrots. These are being investigated by Mohamed Saafi at Lancaster University, in England. Dr Saafi and his colleagues do not use whole carrots, but rather what they call "nanoplatelets" that have been extracted from carrots discarded by supermarkets or as waste from food-processing factories. Sugar-beet peelings are also a useful source of nanoplatelets. The researchers are working with CelluComp, a British firm that produces such platelets for industrial applications, including as an additive that helps toughen the surface of paint as it dries. Each platelet is only a few millionths of a metre across. It consists of a sheet of stiff cellulose fibres. Although the fibres are minute, they are strong. By combining platelets with other materials a powerful composite can be produced. Dr Saafi is mixing the platelets into cement, which is made by burning limestone and clay together at high temperature. To turn cement into concrete it is mixed with aggregates such as sand, stones and crushed rocks, which act as reinforcement, and with water, which reacts with the chemicals in the cement to form a substance called calcium silicate hydrate. This starts off as a thick gel, but then hardens into a solid matrix that binds the aggregates together.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

US Files Criminal Charges Against Theranos's Elizabeth Holmes, Ramesh Balwani

Slashdot - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 16:00
John Carreyrou, reporting for WSJ: Federal prosecutors filed criminal charges against Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes and the blood-testing company's former No. 2 executive, alleging that they defrauded investors out of hundreds of millions of dollars and also defrauded doctors and patients. The indictments of Ms. Holmes and Ramesh "Sunny" Balwani, Theranos's former president and chief operating officer who was also Ms. Holmes's boyfriend, are the culmination of a two-and-a-half-year investigation by the U.S. attorney's office in San Francisco, sparked by articles in The Wall Street Journal that raised questions about the company's technology and practices. Ms. Holmes, 34 years old, and Mr. Balwani, 53, were charged with two counts of conspiracy to commit wire fraud and nine counts of wire fraud in an indictment handed up Thursday and unsealed Friday.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Unbreakable smart lock devastated to discover screwdrivers exist

TheRegister - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 15:32
Tapplock: Once, twice, three times a screwup

Video It's never easy to crack into a market with an innovative new product but makers of the "world's first smart fingerprint padlock" have made one critical error: they forgot about the existence of screwdrivers.…

17 Backdoored Images Downloaded 5 Million Times Removed From Docker Hub

Slashdot - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 15:20
An anonymous reader writes: "The Docker team has pulled 17 Docker container images that have been backdoored and used to install reverse shells and cryptocurrency miners on users' servers for the past year," reports Bleeping Computer. "The malicious Docker container images have been uploaded on Docker Hub, the official repository of ready-made Docker images that sysadmins can pull and use on their servers, work, or personal computers." The images, downloaded over 5 million times, helped crooks mine Monero worth over $90,000 at today's exchange rate. Docker Hub is now just the latest package repository to feature backdoored libraries, after npm and PyPl. Docker Hub is now facing criticism for taking months to intervene after user reports, and then going on stage at a developer conference and claiming they care about security.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

How to Deploy Rocket.Chat on Ubuntu 18.04

LXer - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 15:13
In this tutorial, we will show you how to deploy Rocket.Chat on a Ubuntu 18.04 server and configure Nginx as an SSL reverse proxy.

Guy Robs Someone At Gunpoint For Domain Name, Gets 20 Years In Jail

Slashdot - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 14:40
Yesterday, 43-year-old Iowa man Sherman Hopkins Jr. was sentenced to 20 years in prison for attempting to rob a domain name from another man at gunpoint in 2017. As Motherboard reports, "this may be the first time someone has attempted to steal a domain name at gunpoint." From the report: Last June, Hopkins broke into the home of 26 year-old Ethan Deyo in Cedar Rapids, Iowa one afternoon and demanded that Deyo to log on to his computer to transfer the domain name for "doitforstate.com" to another account. According to Deyo's bio on his personal website, he is a web entrepreneur who previously worked for the web hosting service GoDaddy. After seeing Hopkins enter the apartment, Deyo locked himself into his room and Hopkins kicked in the door. Hopkins kicked in the door and "pistol-whipped" Deyo, held a gun to his head and used a stun gun on him during the encounter. While he attempted to wrestle the gun away from Hopkins, Deyo was shot in the leg, but he eventually gained control of the firearm and shot Hopkins multiple times in the chest. It's unclear why Hopkins wanted the domain name or who he was transferring the domain name to.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Jawbone bods allegedly jogged off to Fitbit with secret gadget blueprints

TheRegister - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 14:12
Staffers accused of swiping trade secrets face criminal charges

Six former and current Fitbit staffers have been accused of stealing trade secrets from rival gizmo-slinger Jawbone.…

Time Warner Deal Aftermath: AT&T Is About To Give Free TV To Its Wireless Customers

Slashdot - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 14:05
AT&T completed its $85 billion purchase of Time Warner yesterday and we're already starting to see some exclusive deals offered to its customers. CNBC reports that the company "will be launching a 'very, very skinny bundle' of television programming free to its mobile customers." From the report: "We will be launching, and you're going to hear more about this next week, a product called 'AT&T Watch TV,'" Chairman and CEO Randall Stephenson said on CNBC's "Squawk Box." "It will be the Turner content. It will not have sports. It'll be entertainment-centered." AT&T's unlimited wireless customers will get the service for free, Stephenson said, "or you can buy it for $15 a month on any platform." The service will be ad-supported, and AT&T will be ramping up an advertising platform, he said. He added that the company expects in coming weeks to make smaller acquisitions to enable those ad efforts. CNBC is also reporting that Time Warner is changing its name to WarnerMedia, and Turner Broadcasting CEO John Martin is departing the company.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Verizon's New Phone Plan Proves It Has No Idea What 'Unlimited' Actually Means

Slashdot - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 13:25
Verizon has unveiled its third "unlimited" smartphone plan that goes to show just how meaningless the term has become in the U.S. wireless industry. "In addition to its Go Unlimited and Beyond Unlimited plans, Verizon is now adding a premium Above Unlimited plan to the mix, which offers 75GB of 'unlimited' data per month (as opposed to the 22GB of 'unlimited' data you get on less expensive plans), along with 20GB of 'unlimited' data when using your phone as a hotspot, 500GB of Verizon cloud storage, and five monthly international Travel Passes, which are daily vouchers that let you use your phone's wireless service abroad the same as if you were in the U.S.," reports Gizmodo. Are you confused yet? From the report: And as if that wasn't bad enough, Verizon has also updated its convoluted sliding pricing scheme that adjusts based on how many phones are on a single bill. For families with four lines of service, the Above Unlimited cost $60 per person, but if you're a single user the same service costs $95, which really seems like bullshit because if everything is supposed to be unlimited, it shouldn't really make a difference how many people are on the same bill. As a small concession to flexibility, Verizon says families with multiple lines can now mix and match plans instead of having to choose a single plan for every line, which should allow families to choose the right service for an individual person's needs and help keep costs down. The new Above Unlimited plan and the company's mix-and-match feature arrives next week on June 18th.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

4 tools for building embedded Linux systems

LXer - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 13:19
Linux is being deployed into a much wider array of devices than Linus Torvalds anticipated when he was working on it in his dorm room. The variety of supported chip architectures is astounding and has led to Linux in devices large and small; from huge IBM mainframes to tiny devices no bigger than their connection ports and everything in between. It is used in large enterprise data centers, internet infrastructure devices, and personal development systems.read more

Indiegogo lawyer asks ZX Spectrum reboot firm: Where's the cash?

TheRegister - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 12:55
Crowdfunder asks to be reimbursed on behalf of backers

Crowdfunding platform Indiegogo has revealed to The Register that it has set its lawyers on flailing ZX Spectrum reboot firm Retro Computers Ltd.…

Some Prominent Tech Companies Are Paying Big Money To Kill a California Privacy Initiative

Slashdot - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 12:45
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: As data-sharing scandals continue to mount, a new proposal in California offers a potential solution: the California Consumer Privacy Act would require companies to disclose the types of information they collect, like data used to target ads, and allow the public to opt out of having their information sold. Now, some of tech's most prominent companies are pouring millions of dollars into an effort to to kill the proposal. In recent weeks, Amazon, Microsoft, and Uber have all made substantial contributions to a group campaigning against the initiative, according to state disclosure records. The $195,000 contributions from Amazon and Microsoft, as well as $50,000 from Uber, are only the latest: Facebook, Google, AT&T, and Verizon have each contributed $200,000 to block the measure, while other telecom and advertising groups have also poured money into the opposition group. After Mark Zuckerberg was grilled on privacy during congressional hearings, Facebook said it would no longer support the group. Google did not back down, and the more recent contributions suggest other companies will continue fighting the measure.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The Most Remote Island in the World is Home to Seals, Seabirds, and an Internet Top-Level Domain

Slashdot - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 12:05
An anonymous reader shares a report: Bouvet Island has little to offer. The most remote island in the world is fewer than 20 square miles in size, and it's almost entirely covered by a glacier. Long ago, it was an active volcano, but those fiery days have long since passed. Now, it's home to hundreds of thousands of seabirds, a Norwegian research station, and its own top-level internet domain. Top-level domains serve as part of the Internet's architecture. Aside from generic domains like .com and .edu, every country has a specific two-letter domain assigned to it. The United Kingdom, for example, uses .uk; Japan uses .jp. The United States has .us, though it's not widely used. The original idea was that each country could manage the websites registered by individuals and organizations within its borders by issuing them websites that use their country-specific domain. But here's the weird thing about Bouvet Island having its own top-level domain: It's uninhabited. It's always been uninhabited. Located in the southern Atlantic, the closest land to Bouvet Island is the coast of Antarctica, 1,100 miles to the south. The closest inhabited land is the island Tristan da Cunha, a British overseas territory located 1,400 miles to the north (Interestingly enough, Tristan da Cunha does not have its own top-level domain).

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

CentOS vs Ubuntu

LXer - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 12:04
Ubuntu and CentOS are both major players in enterprise environments and in the datacenter. There's no denying that both distributions have proven themselves in the server space, but with closer examination, these are two very different animals.

Another day, another Intel CPU security hole: Lazy State

LXer - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 10:50
VIDEO: Intel has announced that there[he]#039[/he]s yet another CPU security bug in its Core-based microprocessors.

Sir, you've been using Kaspersky Lab antivirus. Please come with us, sir

TheRegister - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 10:45
US govt bans agencies from using Russian outfit's wares

The US government issued an interim rule this morning prohibiting agencies from using products or services that have pretty much anything to do with Kaspersky Lab.…

How Docker Is Helping to Save The World (Literally)

LXer - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 09:36
NASA is using Docker container in a space project called DART that is now in development

DeepMind Health told to explain business model, relationship to Google

TheRegister - Fri, 06/15/2018 - 09:23
Review panel: We don't think AI firm has a hidden agenda, but…

Alphabet-owned AI company DeepMind Health needs to clarify its relationship with Google and explain how it plans to turn a profit, the firm's independent review panel has said.…

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