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Most Organizations Are Not Fully Embracing DevOps

Slashdot - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 15:30
An anonymous reader shares a report: Although many businesses have begun moving to DevOps-style processes, eight out of 10 respondents to a new survey say they still have separate teams for managing infrastructure/operations and development. The study by managed cloud specialist 2nd Watch of more than 1,000 IT professionals indicates that a majority of companies have yet to fully commit to the DevOps process. 78 percent of respondents say that separate teams are still managing infrastructure/operations and application development. Some organizations surveyed are using infrastructure-as-code tools, automation or even CI/CD pipelines, but those techniques alone do not define DevOps.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Huawei unveils bigger iron KunLun server at CeBIT

TheRegister - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 15:15
A bigger splash from big freaking box of a server, with up to 32 CPUs in a rack

Huawei has unveiled a more powerful version of its top-end KunLun server at CeBIT, amongst a raft of other big iron-ish hardware and software announcements.…

Linux sha1sum Command Tutorial for Beginners (with Examples)

LXer - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 15:01
Linux command line offers several tools for checking and verifying a file's integrity. One such tool is sha1sum, which we will be discussing here in this tutorial using some easy to understand examples.

The eyes have it: 'DeepFakes' bogus AI-meddled videos outed by unblinking gaze

TheRegister - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 14:54
Phony vids generated by machine-learning models can be detected

In the last year or so convincing fake videos known as DeepFakes – the product of deep learning-driven facial image manipulation – have been condemned as a threat to democracy, or what's left of it.…

Kaspersky Halts Europol Partnership After Controversial EU Parliament Vote

Slashdot - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 14:50
An anonymous reader writes: Kaspersky Lab announced it was temporarily halting its cooperation with Europol following the voting of a controversial motion in the European Parliament. The Russian antivirus vendor will also stop working on the NoMoreRansom project that provided free ransomware decrypters for ransomware victims. The company's decision comes after the EU Parliament voted a controversial motion that specifically mentions Kaspersky as a "confirmed as malicious" software and urges EU states to ban it as part of a joint EU cyber defense strategy. The EU did not present any evidence for its assessment that Kaspersky is malicious, but even answered user questions claiming it has no evidence. The motion is just a EU policy and has no legislative power, put it is still an official document. Kaspersky software has been previously banned from Government systems in the US, UK, Netherlands, and Lithuania.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Quantum cryptography demo shows no need for ritzy new infrastructure

TheRegister - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 14:34
Telefónica and Huawei shoot freakin' lasers down existing optical networks for QKD

Telefónica and Huawei have carried out a successful field trial of quantum cryptography on commercial optical networks.…

Comey, Who Investigated Hillary Clinton For Using Personal Email For Official Business, Used His Personal Email For Official Business

Slashdot - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 14:06
An anonymous reader shares a report: Former FBI Director James Comey, who led the investigation into Hillary Clinton's use of personal email while secretary of state, also used his personal email to conduct official business, according to a report from the Justice Department on Thursday. The report also found that while Comey was "insubordinate" in his handling of the email investigation, political bias did not play a role in the FBI's decision to clear Clinton of any criminal wrongdoing. The report from the office of the inspector general "identified numerous instances in which Comey used a personal email account (a Gmail account) to conduct FBI business." In three of the five examples, investigators said Comey sent drafts he had written from his FBI email to his personal account. In one instance, he sent a "proposed post-election message for all FBI employees that was entitled 'Midyear thoughts,'" the report states. In another instance, Comey again "sent multiple drafts of a proposed year-end message to FBI employees" from his FBI account to his personal email account.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

openSUSE Leap 15 Linux OS Is Now Available for Raspberry Pi, Other ARM Devices

LXer - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 13:46
The openSUSE Project announced today that it released images for its openSUSE Leap 15 operating system for a bunch of ARMv7 and AArch64 (ARM64) devices, including the popular Rasberry Pi.

Cops Are Confident iPhone Hackers Have Found a Workaround to Apple's New Security Feature

Slashdot - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 13:22
Joseph Cox, and Lorenzo Franceschi-Bicchierai, reporting for Motherboard: Apple confirmed to The New York Times Wednesday it was going to introduce a new security feature, first reported by Motherboard. USB Restricted Mode, as the new feature is called, essentially turns the iPhone's lightning cable port into a charge-only interface if someone hasn't unlocked the device with its passcode within the last hour, meaning phone forensic tools shouldn't be able to unlock phones. Naturally, this feature has sent waves throughout the mobile phone forensics and law enforcement communities, as accessing iPhones may now be substantially harder, with investigators having to rush a seized phone to an unlocking device as quickly as possible. That includes GrayKey, a relatively new and increasingly popular iPhone cracking tool. But forensics experts suggest that Grayshift, the company behind the tech, is not giving up yet. "Grayshift has gone to great lengths to future proof their technology and stated that they have already defeated this security feature in the beta build. Additionally, the GrayKey has built in future capabilities that will begin to be leveraged as time goes on,' a June email from a forensic expert who planned to meet with Grayshift, and seen by Motherboard, reads, although it is unclear from the email itself how much of this may be marketing bluff. "They seem very confident in their staying power for the future right now," the email adds. A second person, responding to the first email, said that Grayshift addressed USB Restricted Mode in a webinar several weeks ago.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Creepy software knows what you are about to do... to that poor salad

TheRegister - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 13:03
Code good for passing the salt, but it won't win you the lottery

A team of scientists at Universität Bonn in Germany has developed not-at-all-creepy software able to predict the future. A few minutes of it, at least.…

Samsung Unveils Chromebook Plus V2

Slashdot - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 12:45
Brian Fagioli, writing for BetaNews: Samsung announces its latest such laptop -- the premium, yet affordable, Chromebook Plus (V2). This is a refresh of the first-gen "Plus" model. It can run Android apps and doubles as a convertible tablet, making it very versatile. Best of all, you won't have to wait long to get it -- it will go on sale very soon. "The Samsung Chromebook Plus (V2) puts productivity and entertainment at consumers' fingertips and at the tip of the built-in pen. At 2.91 pounds, its thin design makes it easy to slip into a bag and carry all day -- or use throughout the day with its extended battery life. Flipping its 12.2-inch FHD 1920x1080 resolution screen transforms it from notebook to tablet to sketchbook -- and back -- with two cameras for making it easier to stay connected with friends and sharing with the world. Plus, Chrome OS helps users get more done by providing access to millions of Android apps on Google Play," says Samsung. The Chromebook Plus, powered by Intel Celeron Processor 3965Y and 4GB of RAM, goes on sale later this month at $499.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

An introduction to the Tornado Python web app framework

LXer - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 12:32
In the first two articles in this four-part series comparing different Python web frameworks, we've covered the Pyramid and Flask web frameworks. We've built the same app twice and seen the similarities and differences between a complete DIY framework and a framework with a few more batteries included.read more

Docker: Installation and Basic Usage on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS

LXer - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 12:16
Docker is an open-source project that provides an open platform for developers and sysadmins to build, package, and run applications anywhere as a lightweight container. Docker automates the deployment of applications inside software containers. This tutorial shows you how to install Docker on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver) and how to start using it.

On The Sad State of Macintosh Hardware

Slashdot - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 12:00
Quentin Carnicelli, the chief technology officer at Rogue Amoeba, a widely-reputed firm that produces several audio software for Apple's desktop operating system: With Apple recently releasing their first developer beta of MacOS 10.14 (Mojave), we've been installing it on various test machines to test our apps. The inevitable march of technology means Mojave won't install on all of our older hardware. There's no shock there, but the situation is rather distressing when it comes to spending money to purchase new equipment. Here is the situation, as reported by the wonderful MacRumor's Buyers Guide: At the time of the writing, with the exception of the $5,000 iMac Pro, no Macintosh has been updated at all in the past year. Here are the last updates to the entire line of Macs: iMac Pro: 182 days ago, iMac: 374 days ago, MacBook: 374 days ago, MacBook Air: 374 days ago, MacBook Pro: 374 days ago, Mac Pro: 436 days ago, and Mac Mini: 1337 days ago. Worse, most of these counts are misleading, with the machines not seeing a true update in quite a bit longer. The Mac Mini hasn't seen an update of any kind in almost 4 years (nor, for that matter, a price drop). The once-solid Mac Pro was replaced by the dead-end cylindrical version all the way back in 2012, which was then left to stagnate. I don't even want to get started on the MacBook Pro's questionable keyboard, or the MacBook's sole port (USB-C which must also be used to provide power). It's very difficult to recommend much from the current crop of Macs to customers, and that's deeply worrisome to us, as a Mac-based software company.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

The CIA 'Can Neither Confirm Nor Deny' It Has Documents on Satoshi Nakamoto

Slashdot - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 11:20
An anonymous reader shares a report: Who is Satoshi Nakamoto? Ever since this pseudonymous person or group unleashed Bitcoin on the world in 2008, Nakamoto's real identity has been one of the biggest mysteries in the cryptocurrency world. And based on a response to my recent Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request, if the CIA knows anything, it's not talking. [...] In 2016, Alexander Muse, a blogger who mostly writes about entrepreneurship, wrote a blog post that claimed the NSA had identified the real identity of Satoshi Nakamoto using stylometry, which uses a person's writing style as a unique fingerprint, and then searched emails collected under the PRISM surveillance program to identify the real Nakamoto. Muse said the identity was not shared with him by his source at the Department of Homeland Security. [...] I figured it couldn't hurt to ask some other three-letter agencies what they know about Nakamoto. [...] I received a terse reply that informed me that "the request has been rejected, with the agency stating that it can neither confirm nor deny the existence of the requested documents."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Antarctica Is Melting Three Times As Fast As a Decade Ago

Slashdot - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 10:40
An anonymous reader writes: Between 60 and 90 percent of the world's fresh water is frozen in the ice sheets of Antarctica, a continent roughly the size of the United States and Mexico combined. If all that ice melted, it would be enough to raise the world's sea levels by roughly 200 feet. While that won't happen overnight, Antarctica is indeed melting, and a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature shows that the melting is speeding up. The rate at which Antarctica is losing ice has tripled since 2007, according to the latest available data. The continent is now melting so fast, scientists say, that it will contribute six inches (15 centimeters) to sea-level rise by 2100. That is at the upper end of what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has estimated Antarctica alone could contribute to sea level rise this century. "Around Brooklyn you get flooding once a year or so, but if you raise sea level by 15 centimeters then that's going to happen 20 times a year," said Andrew Shepherd, a professor of earth observation at the University of Leeds and the lead author of the study. Even under ordinary conditions, Antarctica's landscape is perpetually changing as icebergs calve, snow falls and ice melts on the surface, forming glacial sinkholes known as moulins. But what concerns scientists is the balance of how much snow and ice accumulates in a given year versus the amount that is lost.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Bank of England to set new standards for when IT goes bad

TheRegister - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 10:13
What, you didn't do this already?

The Bank of England is expecting financial institutions to be a bit less rubbish when IT goes wrong, it said today.…

Another Day, Another Intel CPU Security Hole: Lazy State

Slashdot - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 10:00
Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols, writing for ZDNet: The latest Intel revelation, Lazy FP state restore, can theoretically pull data from your programs, including encryption software, from your computer regardless of your operating system. Like its forebears, this is a speculative execution vulnerability. In an interview, Red Hat Computer Architect Jon Masters explained: "It affects Intel designs similar to variant 3-a of the previous stuff, but it's NOT Meltdown." Still, "it allows the floating point registers to be leaked from another process, but alas that means the same registers as used for crypto, etc." Lazy State does not affect AMD processors. This vulnerability exists because modern CPUs include many registers (internal memory) that represent the state of each running application. Saving and restoring this state when switching from one application to another takes time. As a performance optimization, this may be done "lazily" (i.e., when needed) and that is where the problem hides. This vulnerability exploits "lazy state restore" by allowing an attacker to obtain information about the activity of other applications, including encryption operations. Further reading: Twitter thread by security researcher Colin Percival, BleepingComputer, and HotHardware.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Cops fined £80,000 for revealing childhood abuse victims' names

TheRegister - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 08:10
Bulk email error blabs 56 identities and email addresses

Gloucestershire Police has been fined £80,000 for failing to blind-copy an email that contained the names and email addresses of victims of child abuse.…

Contain yourselves: Kubernetes for Azure unleashed on world+dog

TheRegister - Thu, 06/14/2018 - 08:03
Microsoft: Plz park your containers in our cloud K thx

Container fans, rejoice! Microsoft's Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) is now generally available, having been in preview since October.…

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