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Java SE 9 and Java EE 8 arrive, 364 days later than first planned

TheRegister - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 21:57
Now that all the unpleasantness is behind us, let us code

Java SE 9 and Java EE 8 have arrived.…

Fathers Pass On Four Times As Many New Genetic Mutations As Mothers, Says Study

Slashdot - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 21:30
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Guardian: Children inherit four times as many new mutations from their fathers than their mothers, according to research that suggests faults in the men's DNA are a driver for rare childhood diseases. Researchers studied 14,000 Icelanders and found that men passed on one new mutation for every eight months of age, compared with women who passed on a new mutation for every three years of age. The figures mean that a child born to 30-year-old parents would, on average, inherit 11 new mutations from the mother, but 45 from the father. Kari Stefansson, a researcher at the Icelandic genetics company, deCODE, which led the study, said that while new mutations led to variation in the human genome, which is necessary for evolution to happen, "they are also believed to be responsible for the majority of cases of rare diseases in childhood." In the study published in Nature, the researchers analyzed the DNA of 1,500 Icelanders and their parents and, for 225 people, at least one of their children. They found that new mutations from mothers increased by 0.37 per year of age, a quarter of the rate found in men. While the vast majority of new mutations are thought to be harmless, occasionally they can disrupt the workings of genes that are important for good health.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Mozilla Adds Tracking Protection to Firefox for iOS, Firefox Focus Gets Multitasking

LXer - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 20:44
Mozilla released on Thursday new updates for its Firefox for iOS and Firefox Focus for Android apps adding new features like tracking protection and multi-tasking, along with various other improvements.

Cisco puts UCS director on death row, to be replaced by cloudy 'Intersight'

TheRegister - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 20:34
The Borg assimilates the infrastructure-as-code message

Cisco has announced that UCS Director will ascend into the cloud as part of a new infrastructure management service named “Intersight”.…

Sysadmin 101: Leveling Up

LXer - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 19:29
This is the fourth in a series of articles on systems administrator fundamentals. These days, DevOps has made even the job title "systemsadministrator" seems a bit archaic like the "systems analyst" title it replaced.

'Dear Apple, The iPhone X and Face ID Are Orwellian and Creepy'

Slashdot - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 19:25
Trent Lapinski from Hacker Noon writes an informal letter to Apple, asking "who the hell actually asked for Face ID?" and calling the iPhone X and new face-scanning security measure "Orwellian" and "creepy": For the company that famously used 1984 in its advertising to usher in a new era of personal computing, it is pretty ironic that 30+ years later they would announce technology that has the potential to eliminate global privacy. I've been waiting 10-years since the first iPhone was announced for a full-screen device that is both smaller in my hand but has a larger display and higher capacity battery. However, I do not want these features at the cost of my privacy, and the privacy of those around me. While the ease of use and user experience of Face ID is apparent, I am not questioning that, the privacy concerns are paramount in today's world of consistent security breaches. Given what we know from Wikileaks Vault7 and the CIA / NSA capabilities to hijack any iPhone, including any sensor on the phone, the very thought of handing any government a facial ID system for them to hack into is a gift the world may never be able to return. Face ID will have lasting privacy implications from 2017 moving forward, and I'm pretty sure I am not alone in not wanting to participate. The fact of the matter is the iPhone X does not need Face ID, Apple could have easily put a Touch ID sensor on the back of the phone for authentication (who doesn't place their finger on the back of their phone?). I mean imagine how cool it would be to put your finger on the Apple logo on the back of your iPhone for Touch ID? It would have been a highly marketable product feature that is equally as effective as Face ID without the escalating Orwellian privacy implications. [...] For Face ID to work, the iPhone X actively has to scan faces looking for its owner when locked. This means anyone within a several foot range of an iPhone X will get their face scanned by other people's phones and that's just creepy.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Tesla Discontinues Its Most Affordable Model S

Slashdot - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 18:45
Tesla will be discontinuing its cheapest Model S option, the Model S 75, this Sunday. What that means is that the all-wheel-drive version -- the 75D -- will take its place as the low-end Model S sedan, currently listed at a starting price of $74,500. Engadget reports: The move to discontinue the Model S 75 was first announced by Tesla in July after it dropped the price by $5,000 a few months earlier. The removal of the model from Tesla's offerings follows its discontinuation of the Model S 60 and 60D vehicles in April, which at the time were the least expensive Model S options available. As well as streamlining its EV line and making all Model S options all-wheel-drive, knocking off the low-end Model S vehicles is also likely being done to carve out a bigger separation between the Model 3 and Model S lines. Custom orders for the Model S 75 will be taken until Sunday, September 24th and the pre-configured versions will be available for purchase until inventory runs out.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

IT plonker stuffed 'destructive' logic bomb into US Army servers in contract revenge attack

TheRegister - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 18:34
He's now facing 10 years in prison for act of spite

An IT contractor is facing a possible decade behind bars in America for planting a ticking "destructive" time bomb in US military systems.…

Puppet Acquires Distelli, Boosting Its Cloud Automation Offerings

LXer - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 18:15
In a blog posted Wednesday, the day the sale was announced, Mirchandani hinted that Distelli's software would be integrated into Puppet. The details, however, won't be coming until October at the company's conference, PuppetConf, in San Francisco.

Ford Is Using Microsoft's HoloLens To Design Cars In Augmented Reality

Slashdot - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 18:05
Ford is using Microsoft's HoloLens headset to let designers quickly model out changes to cars, trucks, and SUVs in augmented reality. This allows designers to see the changes on top of an existing physical vehicle, instead of the traditional clay model approach to car design. The Verge reports: Ford is still using clay models, but the HoloLens can be used to augment additional 3D models without having to build every single design prototype with clay. It's one of the more interesting ways we've seen businesses use Microsoft's HoloLens, and it's something customers will never see. Microsoft is planning to hold a Windows Mixed Reality launch event on October 3rd in San Francisco. We're not expecting to hear about a HoloLens successor, but we should get a better idea of what apps and games we'll see coming for Microsoft's Windows Mixed Reality headsets.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Crap cracked fat-attack Pact app chaps slapped in pact backtrack infract

TheRegister - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 17:30
US watchdog raps breach-of-contract brats for retracted transacts

Defunct mobile app company Pact broke its pact with customers to pay them promised cash incentives, US trade watchdog the FTC said on Thursday.…

DC Court Rules Tracking Phones Without a Warrant Is Unconstitutional

Slashdot - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 17:20
An anonymous reader writes: Law enforcement use of one tracking tool, the cell-site simulator, to track a suspect's phone without a warrant violates the Constitution, the D.C. Court of Appeals said Thursday in a landmark ruling for privacy and Fourth Amendment rights as they pertain to policing tactics. The ruling could have broad implications for law enforcement's use of cell-site simulators, which local police and federal agencies can use to mimic a cell phone tower to the phone connect to the device instead of its regular network. In a decision that reversed the decision of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia and overturned the conviction of a robbery and sexual assault suspect, the D.C. Court of Appeals determined the use of the cell-site simulator "to locate a person through his or her cellphone invades the person's actual, legitimate and reasonable expectation of privacy in his or her location information and is a search."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Cloudflare coughs up a few grand for prior-art torpedoes to sink troll

TheRegister - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 17:14
DDoS blocker well on its way to nuking Blackbird Tech in patent showdown

Cloudflare says its efforts to wipe out a patent troll using prior art have already yielded more than a dozen examples.…

Advanced lm-sensors Tips and Tricks on Linux

LXer - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 17:01
I've been using the lm-sensors tool ever since CPUs became hot enough to melt themselves. It monitors CPU temperature, fan speeds, and motherboard voltages. In this two-part series, I'll explain some advanced uses of lm-sensors, and look at some of the best graphical interfaces to use with it.

EU Paid For Report That Said Piracy Isn't Harmful -- And Tried To Hide Findings

Slashdot - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 16:40
According to Julia Reda's blog, the only Pirate in the EU Parliament, the European Commission in 2014 paid the Dutch consulting firm Ecorys 360,000 euros (about $428,000) to research the effect piracy had on sales of copyrighted content. The final report was finished in May 2015, but was never published because the report concluded that piracy isn't harmful. The Next Web reports: The 300-page report seems to suggest that there's no evidence that supports the idea that piracy has a negative effect on sales of copyrighted content (with some exceptions for recently released blockbusters). The report states: "In general, the results do not show robust statistical evidence of displacement of sales by online copyright infringements. That does not necessarily mean that piracy has no effect but only that the statistical analysis does not prove with sufficient reliability that there is an effect. An exception is the displacement of recent top films. The results show a displacement rate of 40 per cent which means that for every ten recent top films watched illegally, four fewer films are consumed legally." On her blog, Julia Reda says that a report like this is fundamental to discussions about copyright policies -- where the general assumption is usually that piracy has a negative effect on rightsholders' revenues. She also criticizes the Commissions reluctance to publish the report and says it probably wouldn't have released it for several more years if it wasn't for the access to documents request she filed in July. As for why the Commission hadn't published the report earlier, Reda says: "all available evidence suggests that the Commission actively chose to ignore the study except for the part that suited their agenda: In an academic article published in 2016, two European Commission officials reported a link between lost sales for blockbusters and illegal downloads of those films. They failed to disclose, however, that the study this was based on also looked at music, ebooks and games, where it found no such connection. On the contrary, in the case of video games, the study found the opposite link, indicating a positive influence of illegal game downloads on legal sales. That demonstrates that the study wasn't forgotten by the Commission altogether..."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Distrustful US Allies Force Spy Agency To Back Down In Encryption Fight

Slashdot - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 16:00
schwit1 shares a report from Reuters: An international group of cryptography experts has forced the U.S. National Security Agency to back down over two data encryption techniques it wanted set as global industry standards, reflecting deep mistrust among close U.S. allies. In interviews and emails seen by Reuters, academic and industry experts from countries including Germany, Japan and Israel worried that the U.S. electronic spy agency was pushing the new techniques not because they were good encryption tools, but because it knew how to break them. The NSA has now agreed to drop all but the most powerful versions of the techniques -- those least likely to be vulnerable to hacks -- to address the concerns.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Open Source Summit: Day 2 features TensorFlow, BlockChain, and HitRecord

LXer - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 15:46
The actor and founder of HitRecord Joseph Gordon-Levitt kicked off the second day of the Open Source Summit. His open creative community, HitRecord, allows for the evolution of open source film projects. We learned how a company is using BlockChain to fight poverty while keeping plastic out of the ocean, and about how Microsoft and Google are now more deliberate about how they create a culture of openness inside and outside their companies.Watch as Jason Hibbets and I give you a quick summary of day 2, and I manage to understand what TensorFlow is along the way.read more

Firefox For iOS Gets Tracking Protection, Firefox Focus For Android Gets Tabs

Slashdot - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 15:20
An anonymous reader quotes a report from VentureBeat: Mozilla today released Firefox 9.0 for iOS and updated Firefox Focus for Android. The iOS browser is getting tracking protection, improved sync, and iOS 11 compatibility. The Android privacy browser is getting tabs. You can download the former from Apple's App Store and the latter from Google Play. This is the first time Firefox has offered tracking protection on iOS, and Nick Nguyen, vice president of product at Mozilla, notes that it's finally possible "thanks to changes by Apple to enable the option for 3rd party browsers." This essentially means iPhone and iPad users with Firefox and iOS 11 will have automatic ad and content blocking in Private Browsing mode, and the option to turn it on in regular browsing. This is the same feature that's available in Firefox for Android, Windows, Mac, and Linux, as well as the same ad blocking technology used in Firefox Focus for Android and iOS.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Blame Canada? $5.7m IBM IT deal balloons to $185m thanks to 'an open bag of money'

TheRegister - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 14:59
With all their hockey hullabaloo, and that crazy payout too

A CA$5.7m IBM contract to update payroll systems for the Canadian government has turned into a CA$185m boondoggle for the Great White North. That's $4.62m and $150m in US currency, respectively.…

Facebook, Twitter sucked into US Senate's Russian meddling probe

TheRegister - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 14:44
Politicians want to know what happened with those fake accounts and advertising dollars

They may still view themselves as open purveyors of free speech, but increasingly social media giants are being pulled into the US Senate's investigation of Russian interference in the American presidential elections.…

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