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How to Install WebERP On Ubuntu 16.04

LXer - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 14:32
WebERP a complete web based accounting and business management tool that can be used for online shop or a retail management system released under an OpenSource license. In this tutorial, I will show you step by step how to install WebERP on Ubuntu 16.04 server.

Security Researchers Warn that Third-Party GO Keyboard App is Spying on Millions of Android Users

Slashdot - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 14:30
An anonymous reader shares a report: Security researchers from Adguard have issued a warning that the popular GO Keyboard app is spying on users. Produced by Chinese developers GOMO Dev Team, GO Keyboard was found to be transmitting personal information about users back to remote servers, as well as "using a prohibited technique to download dangerous executable code." Adguard made the discovery while conducting research into the traffic consumption and unwanted behavior of various Android keyboards. The AdGuard for Android app makes it possible to see exactly what traffic an app is generating, and it showed that GO Keyboard was making worrying connections, making use of trackers, and sharing personal information. Adguard notes that there are two versions of the keyboard in Google Play which it claims have more than 200 million users in total.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Has science gone too far, part 97: Boffins craft code to find protesters on social networks, rate them on their violence

TheRegister - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 14:24
Image-recognition system posited as reporting tool

Mining social networks for every scrap of information about our online lives is now common practice for marketers, academics, government agencies, and so on.…

Facebook Will Share Copies of Political Ads Purchased by Russian Sources With the US Congress

Slashdot - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 13:50
An anonymous reader shares a report: Facebook will turn over copies of political ads purchased by Russian sources to congressional lawmakers, who are investigating the country's potential interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Initially, Facebook had only released those ads -- 3,000 of them, valued at about $100,000 -- to Robert Mueller, the former FBI director who is spearheading the government's probe into Russia's actions. Facebook had withheld those details from House and Senate leaders, citing privacy concerns. But the move drew sharp rebukes from the likes of Sen. Mark Warner, the top Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee, who has charged in recent days that Facebook may not have done enough to scan its systems for potential Russian influence and to ensure that such foreign purchases -- otherwise illegal under U.S. law -- don't happen again. "After an extensive legal and policy review, today we are announcing that we will also share these ads with congressional investigators," wrote Colin Stretch, the company's general counsel. "We believe it is vitally important that government authorities have the information they need to deliver to the public a full assessment of what happened in the 2016 election."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Attention adults working in the real world: Do not upgrade to iOS 11 if you use Outlook, Exchange

TheRegister - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 13:30
Kiss your Microsoft email goodbye, for now, if you update

Apple's latest version of iOS, namely version 11, may struggle or flat-out fail to connect to Microsoft Office and Exchange mailboxes. That's a rather annoying pain for anyone working in a typical Windows-based work environment.…

Usability testing for early-stage software prototypes

LXer - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 13:18
In this article, Ciarrai Cunneen and I describe how to do a paper-based usability test, using an early redesign of the GNOME Settings app as an example. The updated Settings features in GNOME 3.26, released on September 13.When writing open source software, we often obsess about making our logic elegant and concise, coming up with clever ways to execute tasks and demonstrate ideas. But we sometimes forget a key fact: Software is not useful if it is not easy to use.read more

Hi Facebook, Google, we think we might tax your ads instead – lots of love, Europe x

TheRegister - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 13:14
Or maybe hold money from online transactions. Either way, we're getting our damn cash

More details have emerged on the various plans being considered by European governments to force internet giants like Facebook, Google and Amazon to pay more in taxes, including a levy on internet ads and even withholding money for online transactions.…

Corporations Just Quietly Changed How the Web Works

Slashdot - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 12:45
Adrianne Jeffries, a reporter at The Outline, writes on W3C's announcement from earlier this week: The trouble with DRM is that it's sort of ineffective. It tends to make things inconvenient for people who legitimately bought a song or movie while failing to stop piracy. Some rights holders, like Ubisoft, have come around to the idea that DRM is counterproductive. Steve Jobs famously wrote about the inanity of DRM in 2007. But other rights holders, like Netflix, are doubling down. The prevailing winds at the consortium concluded that DRM is now a fact of life, and so it would be be better to at least make the experience a bit smoother for users. If the consortium didn't work with companies like Netflix, Berners-Lee wrote in a blog post, those companies would just stop delivering video over the web and force people into their own proprietary apps. The idea that the best stuff on the internet will be hidden behind walls in apps rather than accessible through any browser is the mortal fear for open web lovers; it's like replacing one library with many stores that each only carry books for one publisher. "It is important to support EME as providing a relatively safe online environment in which to watch a movie, as well as the most convenient," Berners-Lee wrote, "and one which makes it a part of the interconnected discourse of humanity." Mozilla, the nonprofit that makes the browser Firefox, similarly held its nose and cooperated on the EME standard. "It doesn't strike the correct balance between protecting individual people and protecting digital content," it said in a blog post. "The content providers require that a key part of the system be closed source, something that goes against Mozilla's fundamental approach. We very much want to see a different system. Unfortunately, Mozilla alone cannot change the industry on DRM at this point."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Nothing to see here, folks, literally... Citrix mysteriously pulls NetScaler downloads

TheRegister - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 12:44
Builds yanked offline for a week in bug riddle

Citrix has temporarily suspended its NetScaler downloads due to an unspecified, and possibly security-related, issue.…

Slain: Unions' US OPM mega-hack lawsuit against Uncle Sam

TheRegister - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 12:09
You have to get shafted before you can sue, says court

A lawsuit brought against the hacker-ransacked Office of Personnel Management on behalf of US federal employees has been killed.…

Judge Kills FTC Lawsuit Against D-Link for Flimsy Security

Slashdot - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 12:05
Earlier this year, the Federal Trade Commission filed a complaint against network equipment vendor D-Link saying inadequate security in the company's wireless routers and internet cameras left consumers open to hackers and privacy violations. The FTC, in a complaint filed in the Northern District of California charged that "D-Link failed to take reasonable steps to secure its routers and Internet Protocol (IP) cameras, potentially compromising sensitive consumer information, including live video and audio feeds from D-Link IP cameras." For its part, D-Link Systems said it "is aware of the complaint filed by the FTC." Fast forward nine months, a judge has dismissed the FTC's case, claiming that the FTC failed to provide enough specific examples of harm done to consumers, or specific instances when the routers in question were breached. From a report: "The FTC does not identify a single incident where a consumer's financial, medical or other sensitive personal information has been accessed, exposed or misused in any way, or whose IP camera has been compromised by unauthorized parties, or who has suffered any harm or even simple annoyance and inconvenience from the alleged security flaws in the [D-Link] devices," wrote the Judge. "The absence of any concrete facts makes it just as possible that [D-Link]'s devices are not likely to substantially harm consumers, and the FTC cannot rely on wholly conclusory allegations about potential injury to tilt the balance in its favor."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

How to Get Desktop Notifications from the Linux Command Line

LXer - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 12:03
It would be helpful if your Linux scripts and terminal commands could send you desktop notifications. Well, they can, and it's super easy to set up!

SEC 'fesses to security breach, says swiped info likely used for dodgy stock-market trading

TheRegister - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 11:34
EDGAR database a veritable goldmine of financial tips

The US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has admitted that hackers broke into its corporate filling system last year.…

Bitcoin Futures-Based ETF Likely To Be Approved in the US

Slashdot - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 11:25
The race is on: who will be the first to launch a Bitcoin exchange-traded fund in the United States? From a report, shared by a reader: In Europe, there is already a Bitcoin exchange traded note (ETN) available to investors. In the U.S., it is widely anticipated a Bitcoin ETF will be be approved by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) very soon. In Europe, ETNs are designed to track the movement of Bitcoin against the U.S. dollar. The ETNs are Bitcoin Tracker One, which is traded in Swedish krona and Bitcoin Tracker EURO, which is traded in euro. Both ETNs are issued by XBT Provider AB and traded on Nasdaq OMX (Stockholm). Dave Nadig, CEO of ETF.com and previously the director of ETFs at FactSet Research Systemsm believes we can expect to see Bitcoin Futures-based ETF launched in the U.S. by the end of this year. "Yes, you can already trade a derivative in Europe, an exchange traded note which tracks Bitcoin," Nadig adds. "Then the race in the U.S. is the race to see what gets approval first. Will it be a Bitcoin future or a straight up Bitcoin holding ETF? My bet is that we will see Bitcoin futures approved fairly quickly."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Chatbots: A load of hype or fancy lifehack for the lazy IT person?

TheRegister - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 11:06
Some of these buggers are adept at handling the mundane

It's the age of the chatbot. The chatbot revolution is coming. Unless it isn't.…

Chap tames Slack by piping it into Emacs

LXer - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 10:49
And then filtering out all the stuff he doesn't need to readEmacs enthusiast Artur Malabarba has put the text editor to work taming Slack.…

Data-wranglers Trifacta go public with Google Cloud collaboration

TheRegister - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 10:32
Pair takes aim at $20bn analytics market

California-based self-service data biz Trifacta has today launched its Google-friendly data preparation service into public beta.…

Android slingers tout mobes with customized baked-in big-biz configs

TheRegister - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 10:01
Chocolate Factory pushing enterprises' corporate settings right out of the box

Google has said it will begin allowing its enterprise customers to purchase pre-configured Android smartphones and other devices that will ship with corporate policies and settings already in place.…

Key Considerations for Software Updates for Embedded Linux and IoT

LXer - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 09:35
The Mirai botnet attack that enslaved poorly secured connected embeddeddevices is yet another tangible example of the importance of securitybefore bringing your embedded devices online. A new strain of Mirai hascaused network outages to about a million Deutsche Telekom customers dueto poorly secured routers.

Researchers claim ISPs are 'complicit' in latest FinSpy snooping rounds

TheRegister - Thu, 09/21/2017 - 09:31
Dictators' favourite spyware is working at the top, says report

A surveillance campaign utilising a new variant of FinFisher, the infamous spyware also known as FinSpy, has been tracked by security researchers.…

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