Feed aggregator

Antergos 17.11 – the Antagonist

LXer - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 22:44
Antergos is an operating system that has Arch as its predecessor. This is a rolling release distribution, which means that updates come directly to the OS.

Sysadmin 101: Patch Management

LXer - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 21:30
A few articles ago, I started a Sysadmin 101 series to pass down some fundamentalknowledge about systems administration that the current generation of juniorsysadmins, DevOps engineers or "full stack" developers might notlearn otherwise.I had thought that I was done with the series, but then the WannaCrymalware came out and exposed some of the poor patch management practices still

Why Google Should Be Afraid of a Missouri Republican's Google Probe

Slashdot - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 21:30
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: The Republican attorney general of Missouri has launched an investigation into Google's business practices. Josh Hawley wants to know how Google handles user data. And he plans to look into whether Google is using its dominance in the search business to harm companies in other markets where Google competes. It's another sign of growing pressure Google is facing from the political right. Grassroots conservatives increasingly see Google as falling on the wrong side of the culture wars. So far that hasn't had a big impact in Washington policymaking. But with Hawley planning to run for the U.S. Senate next year, we could see more Republican hostility toward Google -- and perhaps other big technology companies -- in the coming years. The Hawley investigation will dig into whether Google violated Missouri's consumer-protection and antitrust laws. Specifically, Hawley will investigate: "Google's collection, use, and disclosure of information about Google users and their online activities," "Google's alleged misappropriation of online content from the websites of its competitors," and "Google's alleged manipulation of search results to preference websites owned by Google and to demote websites that compete with Google." States like Missouri have their own antitrust laws and the power to investigate company business conduct independently of the feds. So Hawley seems to be taking yet another look at those same issues to see if Google's conduct runs afoul of Missouri law. We don't know if Hawley will get the Republican nomination or win his challenge to Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) next year, but people like him will surely be elected to the Senate in the coming decade. Hawley's decision to go after Google suggests that he sees some upside in being seen as an antagonist to a company that conservatives increasingly view with suspicion. More than that, it suggests that Hawley believes it's worth the risk of alienating the GOP's pro-business wing, which takes a dim view of strict antitrust enforcement even if it targets a company with close ties to Democrats.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

How can airlines stop hackers pwning planes over the air? And don't say 'regular patches'

TheRegister - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 21:01
As Homeland Security hacks 757 on the tarmac

At least some commercial aircraft are vulnerable to wireless hacking, a US Department of Homeland Security official has admitted.…

Fast. For good. Launching the new Firefox into the World

LXer - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 20:15
Thirteen years ago, we marked the launch of Firefox 1.0 with a crowdfunded New York Times ad. It listed the names of every single person who contributed...

Remember CompuServe forums? They're still around! Also they're about to die

TheRegister - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 20:02
From the same people who turned Yahoo! into Oath, the end of an era

CompuServe has announced it will remove its forums on December 15th, 2017.…

All 500 of the World's Top 500 Supercomputers Are Running Linux

Slashdot - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 19:25
Freshly Exhumed shares a report from ZDnet: Linux rules supercomputing. This day has been coming since 1998, when Linux first appeared on the TOP500 Supercomputer list. Today, it finally happened: All 500 of the world's fastest supercomputers are running Linux. The last two non-Linux systems, a pair of Chinese IBM POWER computers running AIX, dropped off the November 2017 TOP500 Supercomputer list. When the first TOP500 supercomputer list was compiled in June 1993, Linux was barely more than a toy. It hadn't even adopted Tux as its mascot yet. It didn't take long for Linux to start its march on supercomputing. From when it first appeared on the TOP500 in 1998, Linux was on its way to the top. Before Linux took the lead, Unix was supercomputing's top operating system. Since 2003, the TOP500 was on its way to Linux domination. By 2004, Linux had taken the lead for good. This happened for two reasons: First, since most of the world's top supercomputers are research machines built for specialized tasks, each machine is a standalone project with unique characteristics and optimization requirements. To save costs, no one wants to develop a custom operating system for each of these systems. With Linux, however, research teams can easily modify and optimize Linux's open-source code to their one-off designs. The semiannual TOP500 Supercomputer List was released yesterday. It also shows that China now claims 202 systems within the TOP500, while the United States claims 143 systems.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

It's 2017 – and your Windows PC can be forced to run malware-stuffed Excel macros

TheRegister - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 19:12
Not enough? How about a few dozen PDF remote code holes?

Microsoft and Adobe are getting into the holiday spirit this month by gorging users and admins with a glut of security fixes.…

5 tricks for using the sudo command in Linux

LXer - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 19:01
The sudoers file can provide detailed control over user privileges, but with very little effort, you can still get a lot of benefit from sudo. Here are some simple ways to get a lot of value out of the sudo command in Linux.

Yelp Ordered To Identify User Accused of Defaming a Tax Preparer

Slashdot - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 18:45
mi writes: California State Appeals Court ruled this week that Yelp can't shield the identify of an anonymous reviewer who posted allegedly defamatory statements about a tax preparer. "The three-judge appeals panel in Santa Ana agreed with Yelp that it could protect the First Amendment rights of its anonymous reviewer but it still had to turn over the information," reports Bloomberg. "The panel reasoned that the accountant had made a showing that the review was defamatory in that it went beyond expressing an opinion and allegedly included false statements."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

What do Vegas hookers, Colombian government, and 30,000 other sites have in common? Crypto-jacking miners

TheRegister - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 18:21
Someone’s potentially getting rich – and it isn’t you

Over the past few months there has been an alarming rise in the number of websites running code that silently joyrides computers and secretly makes them mine digital currency for miscreants.…

Apple Is Back To Being the World's Top Wearable Maker

Slashdot - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 18:05
Apple is once again the biggest selling producer of wearables after its third-generation Apple Watch, released in September, helped it pip China's Xiaomi to the post. TechCrunch reports: The new device, Apple's first that connects to the internet without being tethered to a smartphone, took the U.S. mobile giant to 3.9 million shipments in the recent Q3 2017, according to new data from Canalys. The firm estimates that the gen-three version accounted for just 800,000 shipments, due to supply issues, which bodes well for Apple coming into the lucrative holiday season. That figure was a big jump on 2.8 million shipments one year previous. It also gave Apple 23 percent of the market, putting it fractionally ahead of the 21 percent for Xiaomi, the Chinese firm that was briefly top of the industry for the first time in the previous quarter. Apple's wearable division has enjoyed something of a renaissance this year, grabbing the top spot in Q1 for overall wearables the first time since Q3 2015. CEO Tim Cook said in Apple's most recent earnings report that Watch sales were up by 50 percent for the third consecutive quarter thanks to a focus on health services. As for the others: Fitbit took third in Q3 2017 for 20 percent, while phone makers Huawei (six percent) and Samsung (five percent) were some way behind in rounding out the top five. In proof of considerable fragmentation within the industry, "other brands" accounted for a dominant 25 percent, according to Canalys' figures.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

What’s New in Fedora 27 Workstation

LXer - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 17:47
Fedora 27 Workstation is the latest release of our free, leading-edge operating system. You can download it from the official website here right now. There are several new and noteworthy changes in Fedora Workstation. GNOME 3.26 This Fedora Workstation release, as always, brings with... Continue Reading →

Twitter: Finally, there's an affordable way to pay us actual money

TheRegister - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 17:32
Premium Search API targets businesses on a budget

Hoping to extinguish its eleven-year cash bonfire and finally turn a profit, Twitter has introduced premium APIs to allow businesses to make better use of its trove of troll tweets – for a fee.…

FDA Approves Digital Pill That Tracks If Patients Have Ingested Their Medication

Slashdot - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 17:20
An anonymous reader quotes a report from The New York Times (Warning: source may be paywalled; alternative source): For the first time, the Food and Drug Administration has approved a digital pill -- a medication embedded with a sensor that can tell doctors whether, and when, patients take their medicine. The approval, announced late on Monday, marks a significant advance in the growing field of digital devices designed to monitor medicine-taking and to address the expensive, longstanding problem that millions of patients do not take drugs as prescribed. Experts estimate that so-called nonadherence or noncompliance to medication costs about $100 billion a year, much of it because patients get sicker and need additional treatment or hospitalization. Patients who agree to take the digital medication, a version of the antipsychotic Abilify, can sign consent forms allowing their doctors and up to four other people, including family members, to receive electronic data showing the date and time pills are ingested. A smartphone app will let them block recipients anytime they change their mind. Although voluntary, the technology is still likely to prompt questions about privacy and whether patients might feel pressure to take medication in a form their doctors can monitor.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

How about that US isle wrecked by a hurricane, no power, comms... yes, we mean Puerto Rico

TheRegister - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 16:57
FCC commish wants more than one-page updates on recovery

Jessica Rosenworcel, one of the commissioners at America's broadband watchdog the FCC, has reiterated her call for hearings into what is happening with communications on the hurricane-stricken island of Puerto Rico.…

Pentagon To Make a Big Push Toward Open-Source Software Next Year

Slashdot - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 16:40
"Open-source software" is computer software with its source code made available with a license in which the copyright holder provides the rights to study, change, and distribute the software to anyone and for any purpose. According to The Verge, the Pentagon is going to make a big push for open-source software in 2018. "Thanks to an amendment introduced by Sen. Mike Rounds (R-SD) and co-sponsored by Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), the [National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018] could institute a big change: should the bill pass in its present form, the Pentagon will be going open source." From the report: We don't typically think of the Pentagon as a software-intensive workplace, but we absolutely should. The Department of Defense is the world's largest single employer, and while some of that work is people marching around with rifles and boots, a lot of the work is reports, briefings, data management, and just managing the massive enterprise. Loading slides in PowerPoint is as much a part of daily military life as loading rounds into a magazine. Besides cost, there are two other compelling explanations for why the military might want to go open source. One is that technology outside the Pentagon simply advances faster than technology within it, and by availing itself to open-source tools, the Pentagon can adopt those advances almost as soon as the new code hits the web, without going through the extra steps of a procurement process. Open-source software is also more secure than closed-source software, by its very nature: the code is perpetually scrutinized by countless users across the planet, and any weaknesses are shared immediately.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Restore Corrupted USB Drive To Original State In Linux

LXer - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 16:32
Many times our storage devices like sd cards and Pen drives get corrupted and unusable due to one or other reasons.

Tesla Is a 'Hotbed For Racist Behavior,' Worker Claims In Lawsuit

Slashdot - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 16:00
An African-American employee has filed a lawsuit against Tesla, claiming their production floor is a "hotbed for racist behavior" and that black workers at the electric carmaker suffer severe and pervasive harassment. "The employee says he's one of more than 100 African-American Tesla workers affected and is seeking permission from a judge to sue on behalf of the group," reports Bloomberg. "He's seeking unspecified general and punitive monetary damages as well as an order for Tesla to implement policies to prevent and correct harassment." From the report: "Although Tesla stands out as a groundbreaking company at the forefront of the electric car revolution, its standard operating procedure at the Tesla factory is pre-Civil Rights era race discrimination," the employee said in the complaint, filed Monday in California's Alameda County Superior Court. The lawsuit was filed on behalf of Marcus Vaughn, who worked in the Fremont factory from April 23 to Oct. 31. Vaughn alleged that employees and supervisors regularly used the "N word" around him and other black colleagues. Vaughn said he complained in writing to human resources and Musk and was terminated in late October for "not having a positive attitude."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Heads up: OnePlus phones have a secret root backdoor and the password is 'angela'

TheRegister - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 15:32
Who left 'wipe the engineering toolkit' off the factory checklist?

Updated An apparent factory cockup has left many OnePlus Android smartphones with an exposed diagnostics tool that can be potentially exploited to root the handsets.…

Syndicate content